Bamburgh Castle and Beach - Northumberland, Landscape, C-Type
Bamburgh Castle and Beach - Northumberland, Landscape, C-Type
Bamburgh Castle and Beach - Northumberland, Landscape, C-Type

Bamburgh Castle and Beach - Northumberland, Landscape, C-Type

Regular price
£19.00
Sale price
£19.00
Tax included.

Bamburgh Castle and beach early morning with sea mist. Printed on C-Type Fuji Matt Paper.

This print will be on Fuji Crystal archive paper with a semi-matt finish. The paper is coated with a slightly stippled texture giving a very natural photographic finish with subtle colour. Great versatile paper, very natural and works well with all photographic images. Maintains colours in a very natural way, giving a detailed, 3-dimensional beautiful photographic reproduction. 

 

Specifications

  • Fuji Crystal archive paper with a semi-matt finish
  • Guaranteed archival quality for 100+ years
  • 40cm x 30cm print size, dimensions include border for easy framing. (15.7 inches by 11.8 inches)
  • Delivered to your door, supplied unframed
  • Printed in the UK by theprintspace
  • Free shipping to anywhere in the UK

 

Bamburgh Castle is a castle on the northeast coast of England, by the village of Bamburgh in Northumberland. It is a Grade I listed building.


The site was originally the location of a Celtic Brittonic fort known as Din Guarie and may have been the capital of the kingdom of Bernicia from its foundation in c. 420 to 547. After passing between the Britons and the Anglo-Saxons three times, the fort came under Anglo-Saxon control in 590. The fort was destroyed by Vikings in 993, and the Normans later built a new castle on the site, which forms the core of the present one. After a revolt in 1095 supported by the castle's owner, it became the property of the English monarch.

In the 17th century, financial difficulties led to the castle deteriorating, but it was restored by various owners during the 18th and 19th centuries. It was finally bought by the Victorian era industrialist William Armstrong, who completed its restoration. The castle still belongs to the Armstrong family and is open to the public.